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Posts Tagged ‘ICJS fellows’

Leonard Sadosky (former ICJS fellow) does Susan Dunn’s Dominion of Memories: Jefferson, Madison, and the Decline of Virginia and Jon Kukla’s Mr. Jefferson’s Women in the latest issue of the Journal of the Early Republic (Winter 2008).  No online version for Foundation users (sorry!), but if you happen to be at an institution that subscribes to Project MUSE, you are in luck.

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. . . with the news of Barack Obama’s election?  Historian (and former ICJS Fellow) Joseph J. Ellis wrote an interesting opinion piece in the L.A. Times yesterday addressing this very question:

I never expected to see an African American president in my lifetime. Like the sudden implosion of the Soviet Union, Barack Obama’s emergence was unforeseen by a lot of experts who, like me, presumed that America was not ready — not even close to ready — to elect a black man as president. Even when he opened up a substantial lead in the polls, several of my black friends warned me not to trust the polls. Racism remained too widespread and virulent in vast swatches of the populace, they insisted. They were wrong. I was wrong.

That doesn’t mean that the cancer of racism is dead and gone, or even in remission. But it does mean that the promise Thomas Jefferson made at the very start, the one that begins, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal,” has moved several notches closer to fulfillment.

Click to read the rest of the essay.

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Congratulations to John Ragosta, one of our former ICJS fellows, who has an article in the new Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, “Fighting for Freedom: Virginia Dissenters’ Struggle for Religious Liberty during the American Revolution” (vol. 116 no. 3). Hard copy is of course available for perusal/photocopying here at the library, but you can also get a taste via our podcast of John’s interview with Gary Sandling, Director of Interpretation.  An abstract of the article is also available on the Virginia Historical Society website, if you’re still not sure you want to commit to a trip to your local VMHB-holding repository!

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